Ferdinand Magellan and the Circumnavigation of the World – Part 4

fernc3a3o_de_magalhc3a3es_por_charles_legrandFerdinand Magellan may be dead in the blood-soaked surf off the Philippines, but the voyage goes on. The fleet, under Juan Sebastián Elcano, has to find the Spice Islands and return to Europe to complete their epic mission.

This is the final episode in the Ferdinand Magellan Saga.

Direct download of this episode.

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Recommended Sources

I read a lot of books and articles about Ferdinand Magellan and his amazing journey around the world. I’m not going to list out everything, but I am going to link to a few of my favorites.

Over the Edge of the World: Magellan’s Terrifying Circumnavigation of the Globe by Laurence Bergreen was my favorite source. Bergreen is a fabulous writer, and his book is the best written and most thorough that I read on Magellan. If I had to recommend one book on Magellan, this would be the one.

Ferdinand Magellan on Wikipedia – Offers a pretty good overview of Magellan and his expedition. Plus if you want to read a little more about some of the people involved in our story – Henry the Navigator, Juan Sebastián Elcano, the Moluccas and a hundred other subjects – it’s a great visit.

The First Voyage Round the World/Pigafetta’s Account of Magellan’s Voyage is an online version of Antonio Pigafetta’s journal that he kept. This version is translated into English. This doesn’t include all of Pigafetta’s detailed writings. It might just be an abridged version – or perhaps some of the more detailed writings I have seen quoted in various sources are from the later books that he wrote. Either way, it’s an interesting read.

Ferdinand Magellan by Frederick A. Ober is an old (published in 1907) account of Magellan’s voyage. It is free to read online (or you can download a PDF or electronic version), so it offers an interesting take on our Portuguese explorer.

parenas_magallanesMonument of Ferdinand Magellan in Punta Arenas in Chile. The statue looks towards the Strait of Magellan. Image from Wikipedia.

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