Hernán Cortés and the Conquest of Mexico – Part 8

Part 8 is the wrap up of this amazing series.

We look at the aftermath of the siege of Tenochtitlan, cover the rest of Cortés’ life, and do a review of the lives of some of the key players in the series.

We will wrap with some thoughts on Cortés and the fall of the Aztec Empire.

“The Martyrdom of Cuauhtémoc”, a 19th-century painting by Leandro Izaguirre

Resources

There is a lot of information on Cortés and the Aztec Empire. Below are some of the key sources that used for the podcast.

Conquistador, Hernan Cortes, King Montezuma, and the Last Stand of the Aztecs by Buddy Levy.

Rivers of Gold: The Rise of the Spanish Empire from Columbus to Magellan by Hugh Thomas.

Conquest: Cortes, Montezuma, and the Fall of Old Mexico by Hugh Thomas.

When Montezuma met Cortes: The True Story of the meeting that Changed History by Matthew Restall. This offers some of the radical rethinking of the fall of the Aztec Empire – and is thus controversial in the eyes of some.

Letters of Cortes, Vol. 1 by Hernan Cortes.

Letters of Cortes, Vol. 2 by Hernan Cortes.

Florentine Codex by Bernardino de Sahagún.

The Memoirs of Conquistador Bernal Diaz Del Castillo by Bernal Diaz.

Wikipedia links

Hernán Cortés and the Conquest of Mexico – Part 7

In part 7 of our series on Hernán Cortés and the Conquest of Mexico, the Spanish and their allies converge on the Valley of Mexico and begin the siege of Tenochtitlan – which will signal the end of the Aztec Empire.

“The Last Days of Tenochtitlan, Conquest of Mexico by Cortez”, a 19th-century painting by William de Leftwich Dodge.

Images courtesy of Wikipedia.

 

Hernán Cortés and the Conquest of Mexico – Part 3

A painting from Diego Muñoz Camargo’s History of Tlaxcala, circa 1585, showing La Malinche and Cortés.

In part three of our series on Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés and the Conquest of Mexico, the Spanish march west, encountering resistance from the independent Tlaxcalan people, as well as confronting possible treachery in the city of Cholula. The episode will wrap with Cortes and his army heading into the Valley of Mexico – the location of Tenochtitlan – the Aztec capital and the home of Emperor Montezuma.

 

This map above shows shows the route Cortés and his army took from the east coast to the Valley of Mexico in the summer and fall of 1519.

All images courtesy of Wikipedia.

Hernán Cortés and the Conquest of Mexico

In part one of our series, Hernán Cortés organizes and leads an army to Mexico to seek out the rich lands to the west. He does all of this despite a confrontation with the governor of Cuba, Diego Velázquez.

In Mexico, the Spanish will find something they never imagined – the Aztec Empire.

Below is a map of Cortés’ route to Mexico in 1519.

Pánfilo de Narváez and the Narváez Expedition

narvaezSpanish conquistador Pánfilo de Narváez marched into to swamps and forests Florida in 1527 with 300 men. Narváez and his men were in search of gold. Unfortunately, they are in store for a whole lot of misery and death. The Narváez Expedition is notable in that it marked the beginning of the amazing story of Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca – whose life we will cover in our next podcast.

Please note that the upcoming podcast on Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca is really an extension of the Narváez podcast. A link to that page will be added with the Cabeza de Vaca podcast has been published.

Resources

No better document for this podcast is the writings of Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, the expedition’s second-in-command. You can read it free online. Here is a good online version – or you can download a PDF or eReader version at archive.org.

I also want to give a nod to the folks at Wikipedia. The page that was set up detailing the Narváez Expedition is wonderful. Also, from there, you can access links to the various players in our tale.

narvaez-de-vacaThis map shows the route taken by the Narváez Expedition – in addition to the later travels of Cabeza de Vaca.

All images are from Wikipedia.

Vasco Núñez de Balboa – Part 1

balboaSpanish conquistador Vasco Núñez de Balboa is famous for being the first European to see the Pacific Ocean.

In Part 1 of our podcast on Balboa, he begins his journey as a stowaway on a ship to the province of Tierre Firme.

In short order, he will establish the first permanent European colony in the Americas and kick start the seemingly insatiable Spanish quest for gold in the new lands.

 

Balboa’s journeys were centered primarily in the region of what is modern-day Columbia and Panama. Below is a map showing off several key locations, such as the colony of Santa Maria, and the route Balboa would take to the Pacific Ocean.

Note: the Gulf of Uraba is located just east of Santa Maria on the map (it is not marked).

balboa_map